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One on one consultation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why get braces?

Orthodontics focuses on establishing an alignment of teeth and jaws consistent with a balanced facial pattern. Treatment is aimed at providing healthy, stable teeth which results in a pleasing smile.  Your overall health of your teeth, gums, bone and jaw joints is related to the proper function of your bite.

  • Reduce the risk of tooth decay and gum disease.

  • Normalize oral function related to chewing and speech.

  • Decrease the risk of trauma to severely protruding teeth.

  • Enhance self-esteem by improving appearance.

  • Help to protect the jaw joints by establishing a functional relationship of the teeth that will be more supportive for the joints.

You can never be too old or too young to have braces. Perhaps you have spent you life hiding your smile. Many psychological studies have shown that the first thing people notice is your teeth. Starting at the appropriate age can create improved facial profile and sometimes avoid more complex procedures.

Braces may also improve your dental health by making it easier to keep your teeth and gums clean and may even help make your bite more comfortable. An orthodontic evaluation will give us the chance to find out if waiting for later treatment is appropriate for your child, or whether early intervention is needed.

COMMON PROBLEMS

CROWDING


Aside from cosmetic considerations, crowding may be associated with periodontal problems and increased risk of decay. Spacing can be another common problem.

 

OVERJET

Flaring of the upper front teeth, lower arch crowding, or a poor relationship of the upper and lower jaws can create excessive overjet. The opposite problem is often called an underbite.

 

DEEPBITE

Excessive vertical overlap of the front teeth is called deepbite. Problems can include excessive displays of the gums, lip protrusion, biting of the roof of the mouth, and incisor wear.

 

 

CROSSBITE

A crossbite can create deviations in the path of closure of the lower jaw that may effect, among other things, facial growth and development.

 

 

OPENBITES

Openbites can cause speech problems and difficulty with chewing food.